50 Facebook Ads in Singapore – A Review of the Ads We Saw in 2015

As more businesses embark on their digital journey in Singapore and the rest of Asia, competition in the digital space only gets more intense.

Facebook advertising is one clear example of that, as we find prices of Facebook ads increase across over the board as the years pass, and users increasingly bombarded with more Facebook ads.

This means that for any advertiser to truly reap benefits from paid advertising on Facebook and stand out from the crowd, they must understand how to…

(1) capture the attention of the users,

(2) inspire users to take a particular action, and

(3) generate a positive ROI from the ads.

To design a great Facebook Ad isn’t as easy as it might seem, and to be unaware of what works can be costly.

Inspired by what AdEspresso has done with thousands of Facebook Ads, we decided showcase and review 50 of the Facebook ads in Singapore found in 2015 to provide you with some tips to design your next Facebook ad.

Love it, hate it, have data to prove that we’re wrong? We welcome your discussion. 🙂


The Good

 

1 Singapore Ministry of Manpower (Facebook)

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Interesting copy that is almost lyrical. While we generally prefer a more direct and succinct copy, having a nice ring to the copy might actually work out well. Check out the level of engagement for this ad. Pretty impressive for the Singapore audience.

Of course it helps that almost everyone is interested in more employment benefits. Our eyes sparkle at the words “better bonus” and “rest days”. It makes us wonder if the same copy will garner the same amount of interest if it was an ad for a political party.

We believe that this ad would have performed even better, if they had chosen to use the native Facebook video format, instead of the embedded YouTube video. In Facebook’s recent algorithm update, native facebook videos are favored to reach a wider audience and offers a better video streaming experience and more accurate targeting.

2 Knocki (Facebook)

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Great opening line by Knocki. It conveys that there are cheaper and faster alternatives to smart homes without the costs (heavy investment). This is the classic formula to a great ad: How to [get results/benefits you want] without [incurring costs]. Here are more tips on writing irresistible Facebook Ads headlines. Kudos to Knocki for attracting a new target audience with this ad apart from tech geeks. The ad depicts the product as an easy-to-use high tech product for the masses.

The image used is professional and gives an indication of what the said product looks like. Being a smart and innovative product, an image itself might not convey clearly how the product actually works. We recommend using a video to demonstrate it.

 

3 General Assembly (Facebook)

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General Assembly used social proof in its copy to show credibility in its business. While the precise number of 226,286 is impressive, it is possibly a number too huge to fathom for tech education in the local context — Singapore’s population is 5.4 million, and the 15-year old Singapore Management University only has about 20,000 graduates till date.

The choice of words to describe their course layout in the copy shows out of the norm creativity. With the link description that backs up the serious tone of the school, the copy is overall very well done. An explanation to “UX” or “VX” would be a great help though.

The image used is relevant and direct, which we love, but we’re wondering if the ad would get better results by signing off with actual testimonials and names.

4 Vanda Boxing Club (Facebook)

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Great opening copy that plays on excitement and escapism – exactly the kind of emotional play you want to elicit for a fitness business. Call-to-action to ‘Book Now’ is relevant. The puzzling combination of “A Free Trial” and “Unlimited Classes” also made us curious to find out more.

While it’s understandable that the gym is located in central Singapore, where many expats live and work at, the lack of Asians in the images used might suggest that it is not a locals-friendly gym to go to. (We do not know for sure if this is the intended effect.)

There is a good flow from the ad text, to the image, to the headline and link description. Simple and straightforward.

5 Enjoycompare (Facebook)

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The ad copy is short and sweet. However, it could be improved by highlight its relevance to the audience. An alternative copy would be “Too many credit cards? Choose the ones you really need!”.

The image is eye catching even on mobile as it stands out from Facebook’s blue and white interface. However, the text in the image repeats its top copy. The image could instead portray the different reasons people apply for credits cards like dining, online shopping or cash-back.

6 Philips Home Living (Facebook)

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Emotional advertising almost never fails. The copy is short but speaks volumes.

However, the ads could be better if Philips:

  1. used a full image featuring Mdm Noraini and her son; or
  2. embeded the video using Facebook’s native format (benefits mentioned above)

A direct video link would really help in this case too, unless the intent of the ad is for click-throughs to Philips’s website. Audience engagement could be useful, for example, “Comment with your story and walk away with a brand new Philips Airfryer”.

7 DBS BusinessClass (Facebook)

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Did we mention that clear targeting is one of the most crucial factor of a successful Facebook ad? From top copy, to image, to link description, the ad is designed consistently to target specifically at SMEs.

Talking about superheroes, DBS could have tapped on carousel ads where each and every one of these heroes get to share about their ‘superpower’ and have DBS reveal how they reward SME heroes as an incentive in the carousel images. Names and designations of these SME Heroes would certainly help with relatability too.

 

8 STOMP (Facebook)

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Gossip and controversial news always work. They arouse enough curiosity in readers. In a rather clickbait manner, STOMP did a good job of teasing their audience with the ad copy. The blurry images in this (rare) case provides a sense of mystique and authenticity.

However, compared to sensational stories that STOMP rely on for readership, we feel that this ad does not fully bring out the true spirit of its site. The wrong article has been chosen to feature in an ad. Yes, it might work as a humorous ad for a courtesy campaign, but not for STOMP.

 

9 Lenovo Singapore (Facebook)

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Starting with a line such as “save $300” is attractive. This makes way for a new consumer market apart from the avid and pro gamers. Amateur gamers and consumers on a tight budget will stop and click through to Lenovo’s website. The clever play on the word “essentials” make their bundle sound like a must have.

Lenovo could use more attention to its top copy and image in this ad promoting a new bundle. Including individual original prices of the mouse, headset and backpack would make the top copy more compelling; readers look at slashed prices and subconsciously read on.

 

10 QS Top MBA (Facebook)

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The ad copy taps on important keywords, evokes curiosity, and conveys benefit at the same time. However, the repetitive and flat headline could sound more engaging to urge the reader to learn more about the fair. For example, “Come join us on 22 Aug for the MBA Fair! One day only!”

Here’s also a reasonably well crafted link description that explains the point of holding a MBA fair and how consumers can benefit from it. Although we would prefer that abbreviations not be used in an ad copy.

 

11 METRO Singapore (Facebook)

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We’re a fan of the top copy and image. The two complement each other well and brings out the theme of the ad straight away. “Fashion Trend Report #03” creates interest. The numbering encourages click throughs to Metro’s website as the reader would be curious to know about the other Fashion Trend Reports in the line. However, “Shopping is easy at Metro” could have been omitted entirely from the ad in this case.  Alternatively, the bottom copy should have ended with “Shopping is easy at Metro”, instead of being cut off and leaving the audience hanging.

The issue is the fine print in the image. Apart from the minute font size, font color and font type can be chosen more carefully.

 

12 Airbnb (Facebook)

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From TV commercials to print ads, Airbnb has been a frontrunner in the way they engage potential consumers. Their market is huge, from hosts to home-seekers. It’s hard to relate the 10 billion dollar company to the original idea spark – 3 guys who rented air mattresses to strangers because they couldn’t afford the rent.

It shows in their ads, sophisticated and subtle. This ad touches the heart of the reader and brings out the simplicity of a beach vacation, purposefully using warm tones in the image.  

On a side note, the background of the image shows a commercial hotel which contrasts with Airbnb’s company image.  It would serve more suitably if the ad  featured a private middle class beach house instead.

 

13 Samplestore.com (Facebook)

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A clear cut and understandable ad in our opinion. The bottom copy shouts out at the reader, and for return consumers who have actually tried using Samplestore before, this ad certainly pushes them to re-visit the website. Not to mention that Samplestore has always provided fast delivery and ample free samples.

We feel that the ad speaks for itself. Free samples, free membership, free delivery. All they are asking for is for their customers to spread their experiences via word of mouth.

 


The ‘Could Be Better’

 

14 Singtel (Facebook)

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An unswerving attention-catching title which captures the eye almost immediately, Singtel has created a fresh ad that stands out from the many SG50 ads that we see during that period. A pity the bottom copy spoils the clarity of the ad.

The details could be omitted from the ad completely. The phone model name should be integrated into the picture to make it clearer for the reader. In this ad, there is too many technical details and makes the ad copy look disorganized. Furthermore, a white background would provide a cleaner look for the image, instead of using a bokeh of a cake for the background.

15 Goanimate (Facebook)

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Apart from an eye-catching and different key image, the ad copy is ambiguous. It seems like Goanimate came up with this ad on the premise that they are a global brand that consumers are well informed of. Instead, they should explain their services.

More information on the benefits, such as conveniences and ease of use, would probably help the ad to stand out more. The opportunity to add these information into the link description (below the headline) was ignored.

The text “Drive quality traffic with top-notch animated videos” fails to provide information on the company nor the services they offer. Same goes with the bottom copy. The only selling point is the 14 days free trail, which is pointless unless the text captures the reader’s attention.

16 Watsons Singapore (Facebook)

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The first object that catches our eye is the huge block of red. Shouldn’t Watson’s signature green and white be used instead? We understand the reason for Watson’s ad color choice to fit into the festive celebrations of SG50, but this is too much, don’t you agree?

Our eyes fell short of the top copy. The dazzling red washes out the black text on white background completely. We found ourselves scrolling away from the ad.

It  appears that the campaign strategy is post engagement, where advertisers are charged by the number of clicks on the ad (image, url) or comments, likes and shares. This could potentially be costly, and yet fail to pay attention to ROI while driving traffic to its website. We would choose to engage in either a “Website Conversion” or “Clicks to Website” campaign.

 

17 Dragon Wealth Asia (Facebook)

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Short and sweet – no doubt an ad theme that works for most campaigns or brands. Yet it fails to work for Dragon Wealth Asia. The top copy text “Marketing and sales automation for financial advisors” narrows the target audience to financial advisors solely.

We would think that with the high cost that comes with Facebook ads, more engaging phrases could be used. In fact, the ad copy consists of a one-liner, that leaves us with not much content to evaluate.

18 MoolahSense (Facebook)

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Let’s start with the top copy. Definitely not the most engaging title we’ve seen so far. Short phrases would work better. What most Facebook users want is concise wording, not lines and lines of mundane text.  “Beat inflation. Steadily grow your returns. We are here to help!” could perhaps be a more apt copy.

Unfortunately, the link description is cut off. Instead of the never-ending introduction to what seems like a long company description , Moolahsense could use that space to purely generate curiosity for their E-book.

19 FastFast (Facebook)

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The main purpose of this ad is the concept of “Immediate delivery with no express fees 24/7 anywhere in Singapore”. The text before can be removed as it is a given.

One aspect that is missing from the ad is how Fastfast stands out from its competition in the courier business such as Ninjavan. From what we see in the ad copy, Fastfast did not highlight its unique selling point. What readers understand from this ad is that there is a company that delivers their package.

Aside from that, the ad is whole and to the point.

 

20 Nebia (Facebook)

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The top copy is suspenseful enough to engage consumer interaction. We found ourselves answering the question – how changing our shower can change our life. Surprisingly, the copy is far-fetched in a way that actually attracts the eye.

The advantage Nebia has here is that the product itself is captivating enough on its own as it is relatively new on the market. Although I doubt changing my shower will change my life, it definitely did spark my curiosity enough to play the video.

 

21 PhilipCapital (Facebook)

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An ad that is promising by using the family context to capture audiences but lacks a call to action. PhilipCapital utilised storytelling  on social media, which is one of the best ways to bring out certain emotions in the reader. Telling a story of why a dad should think about investing is a good way to inspire other dad to start investing.  

Monetary issues has always been a huge and important decision for most audiences and we think that more information on how the consumer can gain from investing with PhilipCapital will make the ad more compelling.

The  image doesn’t seem to communicate investment or a better financial state even though it tries to depict  a warm family representation . We get what the ad is trying to convey, but it is just not enough to initiate an action from the consumer.  

22 Hydroflux (Facebook)

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What could have been a well-designed ad is ruined by the insane number of call-to-actions in the copy and the excessive use of exclamation marks. The ad’s headline does nothing more than mentioning their brand. There is no association of what the brand stands for. “Drink clean. Drink with Hydroflux” could be used, for example.

Apart from that, the way the top copy is structured unfortunately projects a substandard ad from the 80’s. In a way, it reminds us of the pamphlets stuck to walls at HDB void decks. In contrast, the image proposes that the company is premier.

23 eBay Singapore (Facebook)

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eBay has a huge market, providing for consumers of all ages. Therefore, they can afford to simply target a certain class of consumers in a single ad, in this case, young children, Lego fans, and Star Wars fans. The visual speaks for itself. The text area is under-utitlized and the sale of a ‘50% off’ is not highlighted enough.

We would expect more from an online based company such as eBay to project its ad copy in a more engaging tone. There is something quite lacking about the top copy, as opposed to what is better designed in the link description – Clear and comprehensive, the link description tells the reader what to expect upon clicking on the ad.

 

24 NTUC FairPrice (Facebook)

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We love that the copy asks an interesting question, paired up with a video of one of the most iconic and relatable comic characters in Singapore. We are a little uncertain if the #StretchYourDollar hashtag is meant to help the brand categorize their postings, or to engage their target audience. We sure hope it’s the latter.

There is a slight disconnection between the two calls-to-action – Do they want audience to visit the website and to watch the video? We would attempt to connect the two by directing the target audience to first consume the video and then hop over to the website for more information.  This kills two birds with one stone, gaining video views and encouraging website traffic in one ad.

As mentioned earlier, the Facebook algorithm favors the native video format over YouTube’s. The ad would definitely perform better in terms of paid reach if they had chosen the native video ad option.

25 Discover Hong Kong (Facebook)

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The image does not sell in the way it was intended to by Discover Hong Kong. Ditch the dark shadows and lighten up the image! An inviting picture should be bright throughout, giving the reader a whole perspective of the surroundings. No offense, but the chosen image gives off an impression of a shoddy place, when Hong Kong is in fact bustling and loud. An insight to a beautiful alley or a marketplace would be a more representative choice. In fact, we think the best way to introduce a country is through a short video, which is absent in this ad.

While Discover Hong Kong  did a great job on deciding to tap on the adventurous spirit and curiosity, their copy doesn’t seem to communicate that properly.   

 

26 De Style Interior (Facebook)

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The copy seems like it’s been lifted off a catalogue that doesn’t trigger any form of interaction with the audience. The link description “BCA Accredited” is also repeated excessively. Unless it’s extremely important to put it up with every image, it’s probably better to put it in the main copy.

While De Style’s images propose to portray that an entire house can be designed from from the living room to a kitchen to the walk-in wardrobe, details are often lost in such a small dimensions. One tactic that the advertiser could use is to divide a landscape image into several portions for the carousel ad format, which might also elicit curiosity from the target audience.

Check out some creative uses of the Facebook Carousel Ads.

27 Fitbit (Facebook)

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Since the copy suggests the audience to find their fbit, images could have been better represented with actual Fitbit users doing their sport. To the mass audience who are unfamiliar with the fitbit, the luxury of product choice might be an overkill.  

Overall, the engagement rate for the ad hit a whooping 96 shares. It doesn’t hurt that Fitbit has a reputation in the fitness wearables industry as well.

 

28 Challenger Singapore (Facebook)

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While it might seem at first glance that Challenger is missing out on the possible traffic to their website or online store using a non-link ad, Challenger is only looking to drive visitors to their physical store and offline event with this ad.

It appears that the “Post Engagement” campaign was used in this case. If the Cost-Per-Click option was implemented and no one clicks on the ad, the reader would still get the message. This benefits Challenger Singapore, who potentially got their word out while keeping costs low.

So, good or bad tactic? Only Challenger knows with their ROI.


The Bad

 

29 Foodfare (Facebook)

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In our opinion a poorly presented ad. The waste of space at the two sides could be used for a landscape image or simple text. Although we understand that Foodfare may be using this tactic to drive the reader’s eye to the centre picture, the wrong color choice spoils the ad. The image itself is weirdly put together. It looks like a child doodled on the image in red crayons and does not serve any purpose for the ad.

Foodfare could increase audience engagement by proposing a hashtag, to name a few: #foodfarebigvaluebag” or “bigvaluebag”. This could spread the word on other social media platforms such as Instragram and Twitter as well.

30 Social Ad Club (Facebook)

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Oh wow, nice nail polish color! Ooh I love the lip gloss! These may be the first thing that comes into your mind at first glance. Well,  we thought that it’s an ad on makeup and manicures as well, but it turns out to be… digital marketing.

Over-depending on stock photos and forcing them onto an ad definitely does not help in any situation. A more suitable image would be someone with a eureka expression sitting in front of a laptop that is glowing brightly.

P.S.: If your audience is made up of business owners, using jargon acronym like CTR is not advised. Never expect your audience to form the linkage themselves.

31 RedMart (Facebook)

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Pretty lazy advertising attempt by RedMart, it seems. Which leads us to wonder about RedMart’s digital marketing objectives and KPIs. RedMart has a unique selling point that they failed to demonstrate in this ad, especially through the image. “Delivered to your door” depicts that the company does door to door delivery for everyday products.

The image could show a bulky or heavy object that would be a pain for most to lug home. Their target audience would be those who find shopping a pain and is looking for an easy alternative. For example, cartons of milk or frozen food can be used. While the plain image could have been a deliberate play to look as simple (or shabby!) the marketer or advertiser could have used a more powerful image to sell this product.

 

32 Changi Airport (Facebook)

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If we were given no information on the ad company, we would have believed that the ad was for OG’s ever too often member’s sale. What is 2X 7% GST? Does it mean that we save 14% GST? We hope not. In ad copywriting, simple language should be used, especially with a small ad space. Unfortunately, most of us have our ‘reptile’ brains switched on when surfing the Internet, and in this case, we are not quite sure how the audience would interpret the message.

The ad would fare better if it was reworded to “14% GST savings on your shopping”. It would be clear what the benefit is and the discount audiences can expect.

 

33 GuavaPass (Facebook)

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In the latest craze of fitness gyms membership passes, we have found ourselves bombarded with ads from KFit and PassportAsia, just to name a few. With fierce competition within the same industry, the need for a strong and clear Unique Selling Point becomes even more necessary. GuavaPass seems to lack a strong USP that would create a lasting impression when placed alongside its competitors.

It is easy to overlook the company branding in the image used. Light green and grey font color on a white background? We’re lucky not to miss it.

Nice sea view, nice posture, and then? There seems to be a disconnection between the copy and the image – ‘top fitness studios’ was not portrayed appropriately in the ad banner. Wrong image for an ad we think.

 

34 Delegate (Facebook)

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Another case of the right ad copy paired with a wrong image. Delegate may have the right intentions to stand out from all the other wedding planning companies, though we feel that traditional is the way to go for weddings in particular. When we think of weddings, we see a clean light-colored backdrop coupled with a bride and groom. The above image is not what we have in mind.

The description is absent, when it could have been used for a simple introduction on the company. As it is, there is a lot of competition in this industry, a unique selling point should have been demonstrated.

35 Qoo10 Singapore (Facebook)

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Similar to eBay, Q0010 has a large consumer base in the online selling sector. It looks like they are driving traffic to their other listings using a single product, which may not prove to be a right choice.

Let’s face it, the target market for mooncakes are usually the older generation who aren’t accustomed to online shopping. Firstly, you can’t taste as it as you can at mooncake roadshows. Secondly, what you see online may not look the same as shown. For us, we would rather buy food products offline!

Nonetheless, a deal is still a deal. Especially a 50% off (provided there are T&Cs involved). A timely ad for the Mooncake Festival too. We would expect to see an increase in site traffic.

36 Faizul Ridzuan (Facebook)

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We won’t be surprised if we don’t see their ads around anymore. As suggested by Facebook’s advertising guidelines, attempts to put up misleading ads will cause one of two things will happen; your ad will either get rejected, or in the worse scenario, your account might be banned.


This ad run a high risk of the latter. Will someone else really pay for my car? Probably not. Deceptive, false, or misleading content are definitely not allowed in FB ads.

37 SURE Singapore (Facebook)

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Sometimes, more is less. Especially when you already sparked curiosity. When you give away the answer like that, it just kills the mood. A wrong move that discourages click through to SURE’s website as readers would simply click to continue reading on the ad itself. This limits the amount of exposure to other articles on the company’s website.


A possible replacement would be to utilise the ad to promote consumer interaction by posing a question in the copy.

38 Castlery (Facebook)

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A classic example of a business getting its marketing message wrong; you are not in the business of creating sales. You are in the business of decorating and make your customer’s house look respectable. Shouting huge sales together with collections doesn’t trigger any emotion.

Also, we would not recommend the SG50 icon to take up 1 image alone, especially when the icon was densely populated the whole year round. That space could be better used to show their audience another piece of furniture

 

39 Bindo (Facebook)

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Cute cat photo. Is this an ad for SPCA or ACRES? We would be more than willing to read the tear-jerking background story of how this adorable kitten was abused before being rescued. Oh wait, it’s a local marketplace startup. Although cat photos are wildly popular everywhere, doing a bait and switch with the image doesn’t really help.

When you try to ask for too much, you get nothing. Once again, we see platform businesses stuck at asking for specific call to action. The only thing that Bindo did good though,  was to beautify with the URL.

 

40 Gassan Pole Pole Farm (Facebook)

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A poorly executed ad from our point of view, taking into account the cost to advertise on Facebook. From punctuation to image choice, it seems like not much thought was put into the ad. It does not motivate the reader to sign up nor pay more attention to the event they are promoting (or trying to).

Perhaps a sneak preview on some of the fun places to go and things to do would be more relevant to their goals. Another tip for event ads is to add the event information on the ad image. This would make it crystal clear for the audience to note that there’s an upcoming event which may be of interest to them.

 

41 ShopBack (Facebook)

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Finally a SG50 ad that doesn’t start with “Celebrate SG50 with….”. A refreshing sight. And since exclusively unlimited local data really is a benefit for all Singtel users, audience have an incentive to share. Wording used brings out the ad effectively, “unlimited local data”, “free” etc., this is one ad that would encourage click throughs.

The only concern is that the ad feels a bit depressing. Shouldn’t Sg50 be a joyful celebration? What’s the deal with three young adults staring at their phones gloomily? This certainly brings the mood down.

 

42 Partridge Singapore (Facebook)

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Stating your solution upfront can sometimes be powerful. Especially when your solution is a direct benefit to your audience. However, the target audience is small. How many Facebook users would want to publish a book and how many of them would actually publish a book? One in a hundred maybe. That’s why we feel Partridge could have included a success story that connects with the readers and appeal to their emotions; make them think they could really succeed.

Furthermore, the image doesn’t show that this company help writers to publish their book. An open book with artsy wording would work better. Or probably a bookshelf filled with their past publishers’ books. Anything other than a background image of a pretty flower, which has no relation to publishing or the company logo.

 

43 Carlsberg (Facebook)

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Other than the image used, the ad copy is ambiguous. We think that the original intent of Carlsberg is to keep the reader on tenterhooks and click through to find out more. For us, it backfired as we have no clear idea on what Carlsberg is trying to get through to its audience.

We’re not sure what does the “they” refer to in the ending copy line. If Carlsberg is trying to communicate that “only your inner circle pals are allowed inside, they are probably the best in the world”, it would sound more logical. Remember that you need to form that linkage for your audience because it causes confusion for the reader and discourage them from the urge to learn more.

 

44 WalkMe (Facebook)

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Unless the audience (business owners & startups) can relate UX & Usability to generating sales or prospects online, this ad would hardly speak to their target audience. Always form the linkage for the audience. Do not expect them to “just know”. You are the expert in your industry, not them.

The image hardly speaks UX to us at all. In fact, it looks like an fitness tracking app image if not for the title. Apart from that, the ad does not prompt the reader to continue reading. Too many terms in the ad copy does not make the ad look more professional. Instead it detours the reader; our eyes stopped at “boost your website..”. The rest would constitute as useless text. These terms should be placed in the website itself for people who are really interested to know more about how to boost their website fast. The ad itself should be crafted to attract new consumers.

 

45 ParkwayCancerCentre (Facebook)

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An attempt by Parkway Cancer Centre to educate the audience. Firstly, using “Do you know” in an ad simply discourages a potential reader. Subconsciously, the reader would be steered into supposing the post would be one that is technical and dull.

Instead, a touching phrase could be used to touch emotions. For example, “Tom, a survivor of stomach cancer for 15 years, would like to share his story with you..” Similarly, a picture of “Tom” and a quotation would suffice for the image.

 

46 CoAssets Crowdfunding (Facebook)

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An ad that makes us go “So what?” when first exposed to the image, which is the key for most ads. The image sets the tone for the entire ad and in this case, the information that CoAssets is listed on NSX should not be the vital point that is demonstrated.

Most importantly, it hardly benefits the consumer. In a way, it looks like CoAssets is bragging about their latest accomplishment. A better image text would be “Become a free member with CoAssets, the region’s first and only NSX listed crowdfunding platform!”.

47 NTUC Income (Facebook)

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Wow, there is absolutely no mention of NTUC Income in the ad copy although the ad is posted by NTUC. What does NTUC have to do with planning the perfect holiday, a travel log, or even experiences on Instagram? We would think a travel company is organising a tour or holding an Instagram contest.

What a pity, the ad copy itself is great and informative, apart from the fact that it does not attract readers to click through. A better way would be to include hashtags such as #myperfectholiday or #mytravellog etc. A simple contest could be done too, such as picking out winners who include the hashtag with their Instagram pictures and printing their pictures for free.

 

48 Kaodim (Facebook)

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A wrong use of carousel advertising in our opinion. A simple infographic could do the work. A catchy and memorable name coupled with a few of the best services the company offers. Nonetheless, we commend the attempt at the use of a $20 promo code, although it has been excessively repeated.

P.s. the couple in the middle picture hardly looks like they’re moving nor packing. Shouldn’t the images be similar in the way that they depict the job that is said?

 

49 Gymsportz (Facebook)

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Another typical ad that focuses more on company accomplishments then consumer benefits. There is no call for action anywhere in the ad. Now we know the company is a leading online supplier of fitness equipment. And then now what? A link to buy is missing.

Rather than showing off the equipment, consumers would prefer looking at perfectly toned bodybuilders posing with the equipment. Some eye-candy definitely helps with fitness ads, it seems.

50 Foodpanda (Facebook)

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A pure branding play, it seems. All we can say is that… we wish we had Rocket Internet’s kind of unlimited ad budget to play around with. We probably could have tried some fun tactics with that. We’re expecting a few more of these ads during Foodpanda anniversary, and hopefully some promo codes too.

 

About The Author

Sharon Neo

I am Sharon Neo, the CEO and Founder of Digital Influence Lab. Digital marketing is a growing giant that propels many businesses forward, and I believe more people should be educated about it.

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